Can you hear me now? Acoustic Comfort in the Built Environment


Acoustic comfort has different meanings in different spaces. In offices, acoustic comfort refers to the necessary sound levels needed to make people comfortable and productive. Workplaces should provide appropriate acoustic support for tasks that require interaction, confidentiality and quiet spaces when concentration is needed

Sound is measured by decibels that can be perceived by the human ear, and as with everything, we all have different sensitivities to sound. This variance should always be considered when designing office spaces. To provide optimal indoor acoustic comfort, it is important to reduce noise from that can come in from outdoor sources, mechanical systems, office equipment and through general office conversation. Designing for all these variables will create a workspace that promotes and supports peer interaction, speech intelligibility and create spaces for privacy.

Learn more about acoustic comfort and how it can impact productivity, personal interactions and employee comfort in indoor environments in this video presentation by Jie Zhao, Ph.D., Director of Delos Labs. Dr. Zhao is a researcher at the Well Living Lab and delivered “What Do We Know About Acoustic Comfort” presentation during Mayo Clinic Transform 2016.

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